Pre-Symposium & Co-Located Events

There are several exciting pre-symposium events this year; plan your travel so you can get in a day early and take part in these excellent professional development and educational opportunities.

Some pre-symposium events have associated fees and separate registration. For any questions, please contact the pre-symposium event organizers.

Supporter Pre-Symposium Events

Co-located Events

All Day Pre-Symposium Events

Morning Pre-Symposium Events

Afternoon Pre-Symposium Events

Supporter Pre-Symposium Events

Exploring Uses of Cloud Computing in the Computer Science Curriculum

  • Organizers: Marc Cohen; Laurie White; Ryan Matsumoto; Wes Chun
  • Date: 3/11/2020
  • Time: 8:30 AM - 5:00 PM
  • Room: E141

Sponsored by Google Cloud.

Cloud computing makes a wide variety of computing resources available to every student. In this workshop, faculty will have the opportunity to get hands-on experience with a variety of cloud technologies, from Infrastructure as a Service launching a Virtual Machine in the cloud to Software as a Service, using pre-trained Machine Learning Models. Participants will have the opportunity to discuss how these can be used in a variety of classes. No previous cloud experience is assumed but there will be some coverage of advanced topics for those who have some cloud experience. The morning of this session will provide general background and the afternoon will do deep dives into serverless computing and using the cloud for machine learning.

Register: https://events.withgoogle.com/google-cloud-sigcse-2020/


NSF Interactive Discussion: Computer Science Undergraduate Education in 2026 and Beyond

  • Organizers: Pushpa Ramakrishna; John Jackman; Jack Butler
  • Date: 3/11/2020
  • Time: 8:30 AM - 12:00 PM

Sponsored by the National Science Foundation

By 2026, today's sixth graders will be entering college and our first-year college students will be the assistant professors. The workforce will see (r)evolutionary changes in the workplace at the human?technology frontier. Participants will be asked to think strategically about how we will reach the future we want to live. Content delivery mechanisms and active learning/project-based experiences for undergraduate students have developed and matured at a dramatic pace in recent years. How can we leverage what we already know, working to improve and broaden undergraduate STEM education and computing education in particular? How do we prepare students to solve the wicked societal problems of the future? Will students require problem-solving skills that transcend disciplines? Is interdisciplinarity teachable at the undergraduate computer science level? Which skills/knowledge will employers and graduate schools require in 10/20 years? The National Science Foundation Division of Undergraduate Education is preparing to have a nationwide dialogue with STEM communities and industry partners on this topic. Participants in this highly interactive session will collectively construct a shared vision for the future of computing sciences education, and outline a research agenda for the future. You are invited to register here for the session: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/SIGCSE-NSF-Future-CS-Ed.


NSF Merit Review System and Grant Writing

  • Organizers: Sami Rollins; Li Yang; Mark Paule
  • Date: 3/11/2020
  • Time: 1:30 PM - 5:00 PM

Sponsored by the National Science Foundation

What is the NSF merit review process and what does it take to ensure that reviewers find merit in your NSF proposal? Join us for an inside look as we analyze the NSF proposal process from solicitation to award or decline. Learn to identify key components, and address intellectual merit and broader impact. This interactive workshop leads participants through each component by introducing related issues, engaging participants in group exercises designed to explore and share their understanding of the issues, and providing guidance on these issues. Approaches for volunteering to review and the elements of a good review are covered, along with Helpful Hints and Fatal Flaws. You are invited to register here for the session: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/SIGCSE-NSF-grants.


Co-located Events

RESPECT/RPPforCS

  • Organizers:
  • Date: 3/11/2020
  • Time: 8:30 AM - 7:00 PM

The IEEE Conference on Research in Equity and Sustained Participation in Engineering, Computing, and Technology (RESPECT) is the premier venue for research on broadening participation in computing (BPC). Since BPC research is inherently interdisciplinary, RESPECT 2020 includes contributions from computer science education, educational leadership, learning sciences, cognitive or social psychology, social sciences, and related disciplines.

In celebration of our fifth anniversary, the theme of the RESPECT 2020 conference is "Learning from the past, building for the future," and will feature research papers, experience reports, panels, posters, and lightning talks across multiple tracks.

The conference is co-located with the ACM Technical Symposium on Computer Science Education (SIGCSE 2020) as a pre-symposium event on March 10-11 in Portland, OR. RESPECT 2020 is proud to include a joint meeting and track on RPPforCS, a community of awardees for NSF CS for ALL Researcher Practitioner Partnerships (RPP).

As in previous editions of the conference, the RESPECT 2020 proceedings will be submitted for inclusion to IEEE Xplore and will be submitted for cross-indexing in the ACM Digital Library.

For conference details and registration information, visit: http://respect2020.stcbp.org/.


All Day Pre-Symposium Events

Innovation in Undergraduate Data Science Education

  • Organizers: Anthony Suen; Eric Van Dusen; Cathryn Carson; David Culler
  • Date: 3/11/2020
  • Time: 8:30 AM - 5:00 PM
  • Room: C120

The workshop will allow participants to gain experience with a series of innovations developed at UC Berkeley that have enabled the teaching of undergraduate data science at scale to students from all backgrounds. Rather than beginning with established introductory strategies as the gateway to computer science, students in the "Foundations of Data Science" (Data 8) learn computational skills and concepts in relation to real world issues and with attention to societal implications. By engaging with students' interest in the applications of computing on data, and integrating societal impact from the start, the program has developed long term commitment to advance computational skills for large numbers of students.

These innovations in teaching not only convey important computational content, but also broaden participation beyond existing approaches to computer science, and integrate issues of human contexts and ethics throughout the full curriculum. Goals include increasing diversity among students learning computer science, giving students a strong ethical foundations within their computer science work, and encouraging critical thinking in the application of inference and statistical techniques. Laptop required.

More details may be found at: https://data.berkeley.edu/academics/resources/data-science-education-workshops.


NSF Institute Planning workshop (SIGCSE Pre-symposium event)

  • Organizers: Sushil Prasad; Charles Weems; R. Vaidyanathan; Neena Thota
  • Date: 3/11/2020
  • Time: 8:30 AM - 5:00 PM
  • Room: C125

Parallel and distributed computing (PDC) is now in widespread use across virtually all of the discipline. Understanding PDC is essential for being able to make use of most computational resources as well as grasping a wide range of cybersecurity risks. Yet undergraduate computer science and engineering education still focuses on the sequential model of computational thinking that was developed around 20th century computing platforms, creating a bias against thinking in terms of parallel and distributed problem solutions. The CDER center has received funding from NSF to gather input from all the stakeholder communities for guiding a major initiative to transform undergraduate curricula to incorporate PDC as a foundational element of computational thinking, akin to the transformation from structured to object-oriented programming. This meeting will use the World Cafe discussion model to maximize the opportunity for participants to brainstorm ideas. Participants must pre-register for the meeting, and commit to reading preparatory materials that are intended to help initiate the discussions from a shared understanding. Walk-in observers are welcome.

More details may be found at http://tcpp.cs.gsu.edu/curriculum/.


Computing for Social Good in Education

  • Organizers: Gregory Hislop; Mikey Goldweber; Heidi Ellis; Lori Postner; Lisa Kaczmarczyk; Grant Braught; Rick Blumenthal; Herman Jackson; Darci Burdge; Karl Wurst
  • Date: 3/11/2020
  • Time: 8:30 AM - 5:00 PM
  • Room: B110

Computing for Social Good in Education (CSG-Ed) provides an opportunity for learning technical and professional skills while reinforcing computing's social relevance. This FREE SIGCAS-sponsored pre-symposium event will allow participants to learn how to incorporate CSG-Ed into their classroom in two ways.

The morning will focus on Humanitarian Free and Open Source Software (HFOSS), particularly on development of "HFOSS kits". An HFOSS kit provides an isolated environment built with artifacts from an active HFOSS project that can be used to learn and practice software skills. For example, a kit containing a code base, issue tracker, and revision control history could support learning related to version control. HFOSS kits provide the complexity and scale of the real project while allowing students to explore a socially beneficial application. Short presentations will provide the foundation for a breakout session to explore ideas for development of HFOSS kits.

Details about the morning session may be found at: http://foss2serve.org/index.php/SIGCSE_2020_POSSE_Roundup.

The afternoon will focus on techniques for incorporating CSG-Ed projects into the introductory computing curricula. Participants will learn how to reframe existing projects or develop new programming projects as CSG-Ed focused assignments, as well as how to utilize open data repositories as both data set source and inspiration for projects ideas.

Details about the afternoon session may be found at: http://www.sigcas.org/csged

It is commonly believed that incorporating the social relevance of computing in the curriculum requires significant instructor time and can only be undertaken in the upper division courses. The goal of the afternoon session is to train the attendees on class-proven techniques for introducing CSG-Ed from CS0 onward with little extra effort for the instructor.


Professional Development Workshop for Teaching-Track Faculty

  • Organizers: Lori Pollock; Christine Alvarado; Susanne Hambrusch; Geoffrey Herman
  • Date: 3/11/2020
  • Time: 8:30 AM - 5:00 PM
  • Room: B113

Undergraduate enrollment in Computer Science and interest of non-majors taking CS courses continues to increase. To meet the increased course demand, many Ph.D. granting departments have added or are actively recruiting teaching faculty (typically with academic rank) to their faculty. The one-day workshop will focus on the professional development of teaching track faculty (professor of practice, instructor, clinical faculty, lecturer, etc.) in Ph.D. granting departments. The workshop fills a crucial need as many departments have limited experience on how to mentor, evaluate, and promote this new type of faculty. The sessions will focus on how teaching faculty can strategize their involvement in departmental as well as research activities, different forms of scholarship and leadership activities to pursue, and best practices for success, promotion, and advancement. Academic leaders involved in supervising and evaluating teaching track faculty will provide their perspective and insights.

Apply at https://cra.org/crae/professional-development-workshop-for-teaching-track-faculty-at-sigcse-2020/.


New Educators Wednesday Roundtable, NEWR 2020

  • Organizers: Zachary Dodds; Diane Horton
  • Date: 3/11/2020
  • Time: 8:30 AM - 5:00 PM
  • Room: B115

A successful career as a college or university computer science educator involves more than a deep understanding of a research area. Yet many new CS educators experience relatively little educator training - and face more questions than answers, e.g., What career-path choices do CS educators pursue? How do I find an institution or career path that is right for me? How can I balance teaching, research, service, and a life beyond all those things? What are the balancing acts involved in working effectively with colleagues and managing the advancement and tenure process? What tips could help me organize a course, scaffold engaging experiences, and build lasting relationships with students? The New Educators Wednesday Roundtable is designed to assist aspiring and early-career educators in exploring the non-research facets of an academic career. Experienced faculty from a variety of career paths and institution types will share their experiences and best practices. Through small-group discussions attendees will focus on questions and concerns relevant to their situations -- and will widen their cohort of colleagues at similar stages of their career.

Application and more details are available at: https://www.cs.hmc.edu/~zdodds/NEWR2020/.


Programming Quantum Computers: Tools and Techniques for the Undergraduate CSCI Faculty

  • Organizers: Amr Sabry; Gerardo Ortiz; Eric R Johnston; Jim Weaver
  • Date: 3/11/2020
  • Time: 8:30 AM - 5:00 PM
  • Room: E145

As quantum computers are poised to kick-start a new computer revolution the fact remains that for more than twenty years almost every popular article that's ever been written on the subject has taken an easy way out, and has described quantum computers in ways that sound cool but are not very accurate. While everybody correctly recognizes the importance of quantum computers for the future of science and technology, the topic actually remains one of the most misrepresented in science. The purpose of this full day event is to correct that and to offer educators (in a hands-on environment) a very concrete set of tools, techniques and materials that would enable them to bring the core aspects of quantum computation to the classroom. To this end we have partnered with O'Reilly Media and will be featuring their new book entitled "Programming Quantum Computers" written by Eric R ("EJ") Johnston, with co-authors Nic Harrigan and Mercedes Gimeno-Segovia. So far it has been hard to anticipate exactly how quantum computers could be used because quantum computing represents such a new way of processing information, but we have reached a very significant point where devices have sufficient power and are so readily available (to virtually anyone) in the cloud that it's imperative to start teaching this technology to raise a new generation of scientists ready to develop it further.

More details available at: https://cs.indiana.edu/~dgerman/quantum-computing-for-undergrads/sigcse2020.html.


Morning Pre-Symposium Events

An Assessments Hub and Community of Practice for K-12 Computer Science

  • Organizers: Bryan Twarek; Shuchi Grover; Kelly Powers; Sangeeta Bhatnagar
  • Date: 3/11/2020
  • Time: 8:30 AM - 12:00 PM
  • Room: C122

The workshop organizers have recently been awarded an NSF grant (CNS 1943530) to build and grow a Community of Practice (CoP) for K-12 CS teachers centered on a shared need for rich, innovative formative assessments, and leverage a technology hub (Edfinity.com) to aggregate, curate, and create assessments organized by CSTA K-12 CS standards, grade, concept/topic, curriculum, and other relevant criteria for intuitive use by teachers of all experience levels. The goals of the workshop will be to (a) build capacity in understanding the how/when/why of the use of formative classroom assessment among the K-12 CS educator community, (b) share (and get feedback on) the foundational work done by the team of researchers and teachers on the project to create taxonomies by which to organize the assessments, and identify coverage and gaps; and (c) recruit interested teachers and researchers at the workshops to join in activities related to reviewing, sharing, creating, curating, and tagging assessments on Edfinity (i.e. grow the CoP).

More information available at: http://csassess.org.


Sculpting Accreditation Criteria for Data Science - a Working Session

  • Organizers: Allen Parrish; Larry Jones; Paul Leidig; Rajendra Raj
  • Date: 3/11/2020
  • Time: 8:30 AM - 12:00 PM
  • Room: B112

The data science field has experienced unprecedented growth over the past few years, as organizations across the globe continue to ramp up the hiring of qualified personnel. Given this employer demand for data science graduates, several institutions have created their own versions of data science programs at the bachelor's and master's levels. Entities such as the ACM, NSF and the National Academies have attempted to define curriculum for baccalaureate data science programs to begin the development of a shared understanding of the data science discipline, which is critical for employers, institutions and students alike.

To further develop this shared understanding, a task force representing diverse constituents has been exploring the possible accreditation criteria for data science programs for the past year. This hands-on working session will allow attendees to participate and contribute to this effort. This interactive session will include: (1) a review of the project objectives and work to date, (2) an analysis of vital stakeholders and project scope, (3) a detailed timeline of key deliverables, (4) a presentation of the committee's strawdog data science program criteria, (5) a working session for attendees to review and refine strawdog data science criteria, and (6) identification of programs potentially interested in data science accreditation.

There is no charge for this working session, but registration is required. Space is limited. Registrations will be honored on a first-come-first-served basis. Please register at http://events.constantcontact.com/register/event?llr=lttbtyiab&oeidk=a07egqgtgpdb83326f9.

If you have any questions, please contact Liz Glazer at lglazer@csab.org.


Computer Science Principles Providers and Teachers Forum

  • Organizers: Zachary Dodds; Diane Horton
  • Date: 3/11/2020
  • Time: 8:30 AM - 12:00 PM
  • Room: B118

To accompany the launch of the AP Computer Science Principles course in 2016, the College Board has sought providers to develop AP CSP curriculum and provide professional development. Over a half dozen experienced organizations and academic institutions have jumped in to meet this need, including the Beauty and Joy of Computing, Bootstrap, UTeach Computer Science, Exploring Computer Science, and Mobile CSP. Two years have passed since the initial offerings of professional development opportunities under the 2016 CSTA Computer Science For All Community Giving initiative, but year-after-year, there has been no community for all providers or teachers to discuss best practices, feedback, or share teaching experiences. The CSP Providers and Teachers Forum aims to increase collaboration and discussion among College Board endorsed providers and teachers by offering an agenda that can include sharing successes and failures of professional development, reviewing common teaching issues providers and teachers encounter, discussing strategies for teacher recruitment and keeping in touch with teachers, and preparing for and reading results of the AP CS Principles exam.

More information may be found at: http://bjc.berkeley.edu/sigcse-csp-forum.


Afternoon Pre-Symposium Events

Building Autograders and Efficient Assessment with Gradescope

  • Organizers: Philip Conrad; Michael Ball; Arjun Singh
  • Date: 3/11/2020
  • Time: 1:30 PM - 5:00 PM
  • Room: C122

Autograders are a critical component of the assessment process for the vast majority of computer science courses. They serve as vital tools for providing timely and accurate feedback, as well as aids for managing grading workloads in large courses. This pre-symposium event is a mini-conference that will explore the myriad ways that instructors can build autograders using Gradescope, an online feedback and assessment platform that helps instructors provide scalable, personalized feedback while saving time. Presenters will share their favorite strategies for autograding student work, as well as sample open source projects that can be used as building blocks for new assignments. The aim is not only to share the technical details, but to explore how autograders can be used in concert with human-in-the-loop grading strategies to promote effective pedagogy. While the technical details of these presentations will feature the Gradescope platform, the tools and techniques will be applicable for any instructors building and using autograding in their courses.

More information available at: https://www.gradescope.com/sigcse2020.


Liberal Arts Computing Curricula: Innovations, Challenges, and Opportunities

  • Organizers: Grant Braught; Janet Davis
  • Date: 3/11/2020
  • Time: 1:30 PM - 5:00 PM
  • Room: B112

Organized by members of the SIGCSE Committee on Computing Education in Liberal Arts Colleges, this pre-Symposium event will let us share and learn about curricular innovations, challenges, and opportunities particular to our liberal arts settings. Curricular models and suggestions for discussion topics related to challenges and opportunities will be solicited prior to the event. Curricula that represent a breadth of approaches, potential for broader adoption/adaptation, and potential for broadening participation in computing will be selected for presentation to the group. These presentations will be followed by breakout discussions of participants' local curricula. Later breakout discussions will focus on the challenges and opportunities presented by teaching computing in a liberal arts setting, as suggested by the community prior to the event.

All submitted curricular models and discussion topics will be collected and shared with the broader liberal arts computing community through a public repository maintained by the Committee. Participants will be invited to contribute to the preparation of a report on the event to be submitted to a peer reviewed venue for broader dissemination.

The event will conclude with a short business meeting where participants will help identify and define opportunities for the Committee to further support the liberal arts computing education community. Optional dinner groups will provide a venue for further networking.

All interested faculty and students are welcome.


Developing Department Plans for Broadening Participation in Computing for NSF Grants

  • Organizers: Colleen Lewis; Mary Hall; Nancy Amato; Sherri Sanders; Tracy Camp; Burçin Tamer
  • Date: 3/11/2020
  • Time: 1:30 PM - 5:00 PM
  • Room: B118

In the USA, the National Science Foundation (NSF) Directorate for Computer and Information Science and Engineering (CISE) is rolling out a requirement that many NSF grants include a Broadening Participation in Computing (BPC) plan (www.nsf.gov/cise/bpc/). This workshop will provide attendees the opportunity to learn about the new requirement, review example individual and department BPC plans, and develop a draft BPC plan for an individual grant proposal or for the department. Bringing the community to work towards BPC has the potential to drive important institutional change across computing departments in the USA. Faculty who attend this session will be a resource for their department.

Registration and more information available at: http://tinyurl.com/SIGCSE2020BPCplans.


Integrating Ethics and Social Responsibility in Computing Curricula Symposium

  • Organizers: Kathy Pham; Jenn Beard
  • Date: 3/11/2020
  • Time: 1:30 PM - 5:00 PM
  • Room: D136

Ethics and social responsibility has existed in computer science curricula for decades, and have become even more critical in recent years due to the many ways technology affects individuals and societies. This symposium aims to bring together those who are interested in integrating ethics and social responsibility into Computer Science curricula. The attendees will observe current lessons, and then discuss in breakout groups. The symposium will cover strategies for teaching ethics and how to incorporate ethics at multiple points throughout a computing curriculum. It also aims to build new collaborations across fields and across institutions, critical for doing this work.

During this Integration Ethics in Computing Symposium, awardees from the Responsible Computer Science Challenge will showcase their lessons. The presenting educators were awarded grants for developing novel ways to integrate ethics into undergraduate computer science education. Learn more about the Challenge and awardees at http://responsiblecs.org, and sign up for the symposium here.

URL Sign Up link: https://forms.gle/noWovToCbBCA1rvB7.


Questions

If you have questions about anything discussed above, please contact the Pre-Symposium and Affiliated Events Liaison Chair.